Saturday, December 22, 2012

Photo Number 1084

This is a photo greeting from the antique shop in Detroit Lakes Minnesota.

Grace Douglas and Millylou DL Ant

Grace  Douglas  Millylou

Grace Douglas and Millylou DL Ant

Look at that tinsel on the tree!  I recall trees covered in tinsel when I was little in the 1950’s. Note how prominent the radio is in the photo.

Thanks for stopping by.  Do come again:)

14 comments:

  1. I love photos that show the room/surroundings.

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  2. This photo card appears to date from the 1940s -- and it has a great photo! Though the visible space of the room is small it is inviting. I can imagine listening to Bing Crosby, Jack Benny, The Lone Ranger and The Great Gildersleeve on the radio. There is an interesting arrangement of items under the small but beautiful Christmas tree. I adore that tree! Like many of my acquaintances and relatives, I would never have a Christmas tree without plenty of sparkling tinsel. In my family, the brief five or ten minutes of time spent in putting on the tinsel was and still is the most fun part of decorating the tree. To me a Christmas tree without tinsel appears unfinished, like a birthday cake without frosting and candles. Regardless of that, I can visualize spending many pleasant hours in this cozy setting on long winter eves. And what a pretty name that is for the [teenaged?] girl, Millylou!

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  3. I echo all of the sentiments of Maple Lane and The Colonel. On that radio I would also like to be listening to Fibber McGee and Molly; Ma Perkins; and Jack Armstrong, the All-American Boy. Millylou is indeed a pretty name but not a common one. Therefore, for those with the know-how, this family should not be difficult to track down. Good luck!

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  4. Yes, the Christmas tree is not big but is ever so pretty. The girl's name, Millylou, is charming and intriguing. Millylou is probably still living and maybe has grandchildren and great-grandchildren who I hope would enjoy seeing this winsome greeting card.

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  5. An excellent find. A quick look back at a time that we long for sometimes. How far we have come. And here is where we say, "It was not so long ago."

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    1. "Boy the way Glenn Miller played, songs that made the hit parade. . . . Gee our old LaSalle ran great. Those were the days."

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  6. I remember seeing pictures of trees like that too in my family photos, early fifties. That particular style of decorating trees must have been popular for a while.

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  7. Ah, that tinsel. I remember "helping" to hang it on the tree--the very last thing!--when I was young. My mother-in-law used to comment every year how she knew a lady who was so particular that she literally hung the tinsel one strand at a time. Me? No chance that would happen in my home! ;)

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    1. One of my aunts was inclined the same way; she placed one strand of tinsel at a time. Gud förbjude! [God forbid! (in Swedish)] I do several tinsel strands at a time so the whole tree gets tinseled in no more than five to ten minutes tops. If there are a couple of us working on the project, it's done in no time. Actually, tinseling is the fastest aspect of doing the tree. While we decorate the tree, Perry Como and Bing Crosby sing carols from the stereo, and within easy reach is a tray of Christmas cookies and fruitcake, as well as hot chocolate and/or hot apple cider [no one in my extended family is a booze bug]. We often have only the multicolored lights on the tree on after dark, with no other lights on in the room except for the TV. Boy, does the tinseled tree glisten!

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    2. When I was little, each strand of tinsel would be taken off the tree and saved for the next year. I used to collect it over one of my hands..until I had a handful to give to my Mother..who would "hang" it on a piece of cardboard. Only the tinsel that was real curled up was left on the tree. If I recall correctly some women would try to Iron the tinsel..along with the saved wrapping paper:)

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    3. We save the tinsel from year to year so we haven't bought new tinsel for many years. We also save the larger pieces of wrapping paper to use for the miscellaneous gifts of the next year, such as the "stocking-stuffers" and "Twelve Days of Christmas" presents. We also use it for packing material instead of new tissue paper. It's not a matter of being "cheap" as some scoffers suggest nor buying into the climate-change propoganda. We can afford new paper, as could my mother and grandmother who also were paper savers. It's just a matter of being practical and not callously wasteful. Why discard something that can be easily saved and enjoyed again? We just roll up the larger used paper pieces on an extra wrapping tube so it doesn't take up much space. By doing so we always have a wide variety of paper patterns for all of the next year's "extra" gifts I mentioned. I think it's hypocritical of some "greenies" who during the rest of the year have conniption fits if they see someone "improperly" throwing away a pop can or plastic bottle but when Christmas comes along those same "greenies" discard everything in sight as though there is no tomorrow.

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  8. I think early '40's also. And I have never heard the name Millylou before. My name is Mary Lou, popular in the '30's, because of the song. Later Ricky Nelson sang "Hello, Mary Lou" but that was a different thing altogether.

    Love these Christmas card/photo cards!

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  9. Hmmm. Perhaps "Millylou" was a nickname so is not to be found in public records. Might the girl's name really have been something like "Mildred Louise"?

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Hi, Thanks for the comments, your input on these old photos is appreciated! I don't do awards, award me a comment! English only please! This is a word verification free blog. I can no longer accept anonymous comments.
Connie