Thursday, July 8, 2010

Photo Number 246

This is a photo taken by  J. Tessman at Wadena,  Minnesota..he was a photographer there in 1914.  Is this woman a Nun..or a Bride??  Since I am Missouri Synod Lutheran..I have no idea what the practices of the Catholic Church are. I am hoping that one of my readers will have an idea!
Thanks for stopping by, do come again:)
Update: Most of my readers say First Communion..thanks for the input! :)

Update: January 01, 2011 
From Alberto: Some religious orders use to dress the postulants like a bride, when they enter to the novitiate. This moment, the Mother removes their bride veils and cuts their hair. 
Afterwards, the postulants retire to another room, where they dress their novice new habit and sometimes remove their footwear. Returning to the church, the Mother imposes them the novices white veil, and sometimes a thorns crown on it.

12 comments:

  1. A very unique photo - can't wait to see what your detectives come up with on this one.

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  2. I can't say for sure, but it reminds me of my first communion. You had to wear a long white dress and a veil and you often got a special candle and/or used the candle you were given for your baptism as a baby. Hope this helps. :-)

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  3. I agree with Happy Frog. This appears to be a "first communion dress" with candle and prayer book with beads. Its hard to tell how old the girl/woman is in this picture but I would guess she isn't all that old (perhaps in her teens?).

    A sister taking her vows might also wear a similar dress however. There are orders that wear white habits.

    http://www.institute-christ-king.org/vocations/sisters/

    So I don't know - this might be "too close to call".

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  4. I'm voting communion. I recently did a bit of research into habits and wimples and most nuns in the late 19th or early 20th centuries wore black or gray habits. Novices prior to taking their vows didn't always wear the wimple, but after they took their vows, nearly every nun shaved her head.

    That being said, I wonder if this is an Eastern European woman, as the accessories are differently elaborate from some Western Catholic and Christian accessories.

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  5. Hi again, I found a similar first communion image on the web (though from 1890) here: http://reflections.mndigital.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/scott&CISOPTR=199&CISOBOX=1&REC=16

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  6. Happy Frog Thanks that was a great photo you found from 1890..although twenty years separate these photos they are very similar..First Communion it is! :)

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  7. Wow! It seems like this girl was to old to be making first communion, but after looking at Happy Frog's example and another at the same site, I concur, as well. I faintly remember having a similar discussion on this. Currently, children generally make their first communion in 2nd grade, as I also did, and confirmation around 9th-10th, although mine was in 6th grade in the early 70s. In the past, this might have been done at the same time. I would have to do more research to know for sure.

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  8. It is a unique photo. The candle is so tall and the crown with veil is unique for any faith.

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  9. I'm chiming in late here and didn't look at Happy Frog's link to the other photo. My first impression was Santa Lucia day, but I can't remember if/what they carried. A candle for sure, I think.

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  10. Peace and Good!
    Some religious orders use to dress the postulants like a bride, when they enter to the novitiate. This moment, the Mother removes their bride veils and cuts their hair.
    Afterwards, the postulants retire to another room, where they dress their novice new habit and sometimes remove their footwear. Returning to the church, the Mother imposes them the novices white veil, and sometimes a thorns crown on it.
    I wish you a Happy New Year!
    Br. Alberto Guimaraes SFO
    Braga Secular Franciscan Fraternity - Portugal

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  11. Thank you Alberto..great info that I will add to the photo:)

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Hi, Thanks for the comments, your input on these old photos is appreciated! I don't do awards, award me a comment! English only please! This is a word verification free blog. I can no longer accept anonymous comments.
Connie