Sunday, January 3, 2010

Photo Number Seventy-One



This is Earl Eihternach..correction .. ( Echternach).  This photo was taken by J Haynes.  I know nothing about Earl..except that his long dress was beautiful.

J. Haynes was born in 1833 in Ohio. he moved to NYC and studied photography in 1862.  In 1867 he moved to Chicago, and from 1881 to 1897 he was a photographer in Sterling. ILL.

I will date this photo 1897. It is a Cabinet Card and no doubt some Grandma or Aunt was very happy to have it!
On a side note, I read where the towns of Sterling, Nebraska and Sterling, Colorado were both started by residents of Sterling, Illinois as they headed west.  Interesting.

Thanks for stopping, do come again:)
Update: From Norkio: All infants were dressed in dresses, most often white cotton ones, up until the 20th century really. White fabric was easy to boil and bleach if it got stained. Also, the dress gave easy access to "clouts" which were the early diapers, made of heavy cotton or wool and very absorbent - but no where near Pampers, lol. Most christening dresses were made during the mother's confinement, depending on her level of wealth. A woman who had to work in some capacity (as a domestic for example) might not have the income for the silks and lawns we see in some of the museum pieces, and women of lower income would often make the child's dresses from her old petticoats. The more elaborate the gown, the greater the wealth/status in society. It was extremely common to use the same christening dress for all family members for many generations. I did a whole educational piece for a local museum on 19th century children's gowns when I was pregnant a few years ago. :-) Did you know that pink was considered the stronger color and blue the weaker? It wasn't until the 20th century that they were identified as pink for girls and blue for boys, used to be the other way around.
I found this info very interesting..and it explains a few questions I had about the gowns.. Thanks Norkio! :) 

*** Update  Abra Wrote:  Hi Connie: I found an Earl Echternach, born March of 1896, in the 1900 census, living in Jordan township, Whiteside Co., Illinois. In 1910, 1920, 1930 he lived in Monson Township, Traverse Co., MN. He was with his parents all this time, although he did register for WW 1 draft. His draft card states he was born in Sterling Illinois, March 18, 1896 (1 day before my grandpa!) and at the time of registration, was living in Wheaton MN, employed by his father as a farm laborer. He was of medium build, medium height, blue eyes, dark hair, not bald (or bold!--hard to read the card) and not disabled. He registered on June 5, 1917. He died in February of 1986 in Wheaton MN. It appears he never married. There are some family tree entries and there is the possibility of contacting the person responsible for those, if you wish.

9 comments:

  1. am enjoying your forgotten photos series..
    very, very much!
    I have a batch of similar family photos with really no way to identify them..
    perhaps your genealogist friend could assist me?
    thanks.. and keep up the good works..
    warm hugs..
    Loui♥

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  2. It was a beautiful baby gown. Looks like a lot of work went into making it too. That is interesting info about the starting of the towns of Sterling. How different it was back then to just stake claim to a piece of land and give it a name.

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  3. That's a really elegant baby gown. Don't you know his family was proud of this photo?

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  4. I guess the dress thing was because of the need to change diapers. As long as it is like a dress, they just as well make it really fancy. I have a photo of my late father-in-law with his dress picture.

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  5. All infants were dressed in dresses, most often white cotton ones, up until the 20th century really. White fabric was easy to boil and bleach if it got stained. Also, the dress gave easy access to "clouts" which were the early diapers, made of heavy cotton or wool and very absorbent - but no where near Pampers, lol. Most christening dresses were made during the mother's confinement, depending on her level of wealth. A woman who had to work in some capacity (as a domestic for example) might not have the income for the silks and lawns we see in some of the museum pieces, and women of lower income would often make the child's dresses from her old petticoats. The more elaborate the gown, the greater the wealth/status in society. It was extremely common to use the same christening dress for all family members for many generations. I did a whole educational piece for a local museum on 19th century children's gowns when I was pregnant a few years ago. :-) Did you know that pink was considered the stronger color and blue the weaker? It wasn't until the 20th century that they were identified as pink for girls and blue for boys, used to be the other way around.

    As a side note, I looked on ancestry.com and the last name Eihternach doesn't show up at all. Might be misspelled or changed from the original spelling. I'd be happy to look further with some other spelling suggestions.

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  6. Norkio, Possible that it is misspelled.. I will scan it and add it to the post..could the i be a c?? :)

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  7. Hi Connie: I found an Earl Echternach, born March of 1896, in the 1900 census, living in Jordan township, Whiteside Co., Illinois. In 1910, 1920, 1930 he lived in Monson Township, Traverse Co., MN. He was with his parents all this time, although he did register for WW 1 draft. His draft card states he was born in Sterling Illinois, March 18, 1896 (1 day before my grandpa!) and at the time of registration, was living in Wheaton MN, employed by his father as a farm laborer. He was of medium build, medium height, blue eyes, dark hair, not bald (or bold!--hard to read the card) and not disabled. He registered on June 5, 1917. He died in February of 1986 in Wheaton MN. It appears he never married. There are some family tree entries and there is the possibility of contacting the person responsible for those, if you wish.

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  8. Thanks Abra! Yes contact them please, IF you have the time..if not email me the info. You are a doll! :)

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  9. I sent messages to two people that have Earl listed in their family tree, giving them the address of your blog. I hope they visit. Perhaps they will know some of your other photos, too! Have a great day!!

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Hi, Thanks for the comments, your input on these old photos is appreciated! I don't do awards, award me a comment! English only please! This is a word verification free blog. I can no longer accept anonymous comments.
Connie