Thursday, January 17, 2013

Photo Number 1110

This is a CdV from the antique shop in Fergus Falls Minnesota.
CdV Man with hat Fergus Falls Antiques
Wm. Davis was at No.1 Cherry Street in Mankato Minn only one year 1885.  That is the year I would have guessed.  The suit coat buttoned once at the top seems to be a good clue for that year for men’s fashions.  Note the posing stand.  He must have thought his hat was quite important.
The card is pinkish beige on the front and cream on the back.
CdV Man with hat Fergus Falls Antiques back
There is some writing on the back of the card..in a foreign language.
CdV Man with hat Fergus Falls Antiques back
If anyone has a clue what it says please leave me a comment.

Thanks for stopping by.  Do come again:)

Translation from crex:
 "Schatz du bist mein und ich bin dein du geliebtes, Gustave". I guess the man on the photo is Gustave.

That would (aprox) translate to - Treasure, you are mine and I am yours, my dearest. Gustave. 

16 comments:

  1. Mrs. John A. AndersonJanuary 17, 2013 at 4:33 AM

    This young gentleman probably had several copies of this photograph made so as to send some of them to his family and/or friends here in the U.S.A. and [if he was an immigrant] to those back home in "the old country" [probably Germany or Sweden]. He was still on the thin side. I hope he eventually married a good woman who filled him out a bit with her good cooking.

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  2. The writing is in german, not swedish.

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  3. This guy looks much more hungry than Tuesday's dude and needs more than just biscuits and gravy. He needs several helpings of my Charlotta's kroppkakor. Either that or it was her kroppkakor that put that look on his face. [I'll pay for that one.]

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  4. The lady of the house has informed me I should have translated for the non-Swedes. I quess there are some in every crowd. Kroppkakor [the plural term] are Swedish potato dumplings served in a thick gravy. Kroppkakor translates as "body cakes." Kroppkaka is the singular spelling [meaning one body cake]. And, just to be sure, I double-checked both of those spellings via a good, two-volume Swedish-English/English-Swedish dictionary that I purchased from Sweden a few years ago.

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  5. Mrs. John A. AndersonJanuary 17, 2013 at 6:01 AM

    Some Swedes like kroppkakor with melted butter [with no gravy]. I prefer to slice the kroppkakor and then fry them in butter. There is no decent substitute for real butter when frying kroppkakor [or a husband's backside].

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    1. That´s a dilicious way to serve "kroppkakor"! Lingonberries preserved uncooked (raw stirred with sugar - unsure correct translate...) nice complement. (Comment from Sweden).

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  6. I had to Google CdV. I've learned something new today. :)

    I found myself looking at the photo trying to figure out the quality (or lack) of the suit: it seems limp, lacking crispness. I also looked at the seams and stitching. The shoes look soft and dusty.

    Am I being unfair and comparing him too much to today's standards?

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    1. The suit was most likely a hand me down..he was most likely a poor farmer:)

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    2. Mrs. John A. [Charlotta] AndersonJanuary 18, 2013 at 5:16 AM

      This man appears to have been very young when the photograph was taken so he may not have yet been established in any particular field of endeavor. Most interesting to me is the young man's hat. People may wear whatever they wish [especially in "dress" clothes] but that style of hat was more often worn by men in urban areas rather than on farms. The photograph was taken in Mankato, which in 1885 was a good-sized community of about 7,000. I think it more likely that the young man in the photo [like many hundreds of other young men] was employed within the urban area of Mankato.

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  7. A dear fellow caught in the photographer's headlights.

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  8. That Norwegian GuyJanuary 19, 2013 at 5:20 PM

    I'd wish someone could translate the handwritten text on the back.

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  9. I don't speak much german, but here is my go at a transcription - "Schatz du bist mein und ich bin dein du geliebtes, Gustave". I guess the man on the photo is Gustave.

    That would (aprox) translate to - Treasure, you are mine and I am yours, my dearest. Gustave. Hmm, english isn't my native language either :)

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  10. Thanks crex, I finally noticed the comment to be approved! :)

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  11. That Norwegian GuyJanuary 25, 2013 at 5:43 PM

    Thanks a lot crex! Gothic (?) handwriting isn't my speciality :/

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  12. The literal translation for "Schatz" is "treasure" - but it is a German term of endearment, most similar to "sweetheart" in English. I am guessing this young man was giving his sweetheart a photo of himself. :)

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Hi, Thanks for the comments, your input on these old photos is appreciated! I don't do awards, award me a comment! English only please! This is a word verification free blog. I can no longer accept anonymous comments.
Connie