Thursday, August 25, 2011

Photo Number 635

This is a CdV from the antique shop in Detroit Lakes Minnesota.

CdV Michigan DL Antiques

The photograph is from C T Cornwell of Cold Water, Mich.

Cdv’s with rounded corners appeared in the 1870’s.  This dress appears to have dropped shoulders, which were popular in the 1860’s.   However her ears are showing (In 1865 ears were shown..but not before that.).   So I will guess 1875, her clothing was a bit out of style and I think she may have been wearing a snood.  A snood is a lace net that was tied tightly around your hair.

Thanks for stopping by, do come again:)

4 comments:

  1. "C T Cornwall" was Charles T. Cornwall, born Sept., 1821 in New York and retired before the 1900 US census.

    He would have been an old(er) gentleman around the time this photograph was taken.

    I like that big bow.

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  2. Snoods came back in WWII to hold Rosie the Riveter's long hair out of the machinery

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  3. Pretty girl in the photo. My college girlfriend's daughter married recently and she wore a pretty white snood instead of a veil. It was very pretty!
    M. Lane

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  4. I think she might have her hair braided under her hairnet. The style was to dress the hair and then cover it with the net to hold in the strays. I have read that the word snood was used in Europe for hundreds of years but for some reason Americans eschewed that word and just said hairnet for some reason. And of course snoods/hairnets of the 19th century are quite different from the snoods of WW2. In the 19th century they were more like fine mesh that would blend in with the hair color, but in the 20th century they became bolder colors and larger crochet.

    I'd have to agree with you on the fashions, she seems a little behind the times.

    ReplyDelete

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Connie