Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Photo Number 627

This is a photo from the Antique Shop in Detroit Lakes Minnesota.
Blonde ladyCdV DL Antiques
When I saw this photograph something dawned on me.  Very few women with light colored hair had their photograph taken…if they did I have not seen any.
She is wearing a lovely blouse with lots of ruching.  My eye wants desperately to see an amber colored fabric, with the gal having very blue eyes.
Blonde Lady back CdV
Christiania on the front of the CdV,   Kristiania on the back of the card is Oslo Norway. Gustav Borgen was a photographer there from 1891 to 1922.  This photo is a CdV or Cartes d’ visite or visiting card.
Thanks for stopping by, do come again:)

Update from Anonymous:
Gustav Borgen donated his collection (of glass plates ++?) to a Norwegian Museum (Norsk Folkemuseum). They have digitized (part of?) the collection, the portraits can be found here:

http://bit.ly/qa2snH



Update from Iggy:
He found the photo in the collection
http://www.primusweb.no/things/thing/NF/NFB.06484?pos=1548


Update from Anonymous:
The page gives the name as "Just t.". I'm not sure what to make out of that.

Just was a reasonable common given name for boys, but I can also find it as a surname (but rather rare, I think).

Gustav Borgen must have been quite recognized in his time. He has portrayed several known figures, for instance a much used portrait of Henrik Ibsen, and several of the Norwegian royal family.

I also find that he at young age worked for H. Ingeberg from yesterday.

10 comments:

  1. Gustav Borgen donated his collection (of glass plates ++?) to a Norwegian Museum (Norsk Folkemuseum). They have digitized (part of?) the collection, the portraits can be found here:

    http://bit.ly/qa2snH

    Someone with a lot of time on their hand might see if they find the portrait, then you would probably find the name as well.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I suppose the photos are not there because there were very few natural blondes in those days. I don't remember ever seeing a blonde but one who used to come to our house to have my mom take some material out of her new blouses so they would fit her body skin tight. There were lots of white haired ladies or silver haired ladies when I was growing up but most were salt and pepper types.

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  3. Did they not realize, we would be looking at one such photograph admiringly? Colorless and beautiful!

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  4. I love this one. Very pretty.

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  5. She is very pretty and you are right, I've seen very few blondes in old pics. It's fun to imagine her eye color and what color she was wearing! Mrs. M. Lane

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  6. I looked through about 200 of the photos from the link given by the first commentator. I found this one:

    http://www.primusweb.no/things/thing/NF/NFB.06484?pos=1548

    I'm sure its a match. I'm not sure if the sitter is identified - I really can't read the page very well.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The page gives the name as "Just t.". I'm not sure what to make out of that.

    Just was a reasonable common given name for boys, but I can also find it as a surname (but rather rare, I think).

    Gustav Borgen must have been quite recognized in his time. He has portrayed several known figures, for instance a much used portrait of Henrik Ibsen, and several of the Norwegian royal family.

    I also find that he at young age worked for H. Ingeberg from yesterday.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I look at that blouse and think, wow, how much work went into the sewing of it. That took a very talented seamstress.

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  9. I found a Gustav Borgen photo of a second cousin to me in the collection. The museum can send you a copy of a photo for a fee as long as you abide by copyright rules and credit them. Steve in San Francisco

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Steve, How exciting that you found a relative! :)

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Hi, Thanks for the comments, your input on these old photos is appreciated! I don't do awards, award me a comment! English only please! This is a word verification free blog. I can no longer accept anonymous comments.
Connie