Monday, February 21, 2011

Photo Number 457

This is it..the last photo in the Nettie Parks Album.  It has been quite an adventure.  I have been communicating with two groups of family members.  Hopefully I will send originals of their closest family members to them soon.  I have been waiting just a bit because I wanted to finish presenting all the photos from this album. 
Extra Four Hat Ladies Paxton Ill Four ladies in hats, the photo was taken at Stouts Studio in Paxton, ILL.  I will guess that this photograph was taken around 1890.  I love the hats all piled up with flowers.
Thanks for stopping by, do come again:)
The entire Nettie Parks album went Full Circle 64 on November 20, 2012

9 comments:

  1. Wow, that's got to be hard to decide who to pass this collection on to when you have more than one family member coming forward. It seems such a shame to break it up after all these years.

    I think reuniting these old photos with their families is a wonderful thing and you are a beautiful person to be putting so much effort into this. Thanks again for letting us be part of the fun!

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  2. I think the original photos should go to only one family member so they stay together, but it would be wonderful for the other family member to have some part of them too.

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  3. Wow. How much, do you suppose, did their clothing weigh?

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  4. Fabulous hats, and I'm sad we've reached the end of the Nettie album - there have been so many interesting photos. I'm sure you have more in the pipeline for us to enjoy :-)

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  5. What a great picture! I'd love to have a hat like that. :)

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  6. I concur that this is likely an 1890s photo. The stand collars with lace trim are very typical of the era.

    @ Maybelline, just to give you an idea, they are all likely wearing at least one petticoat under their skirts (more likely 2), drawers, and a chemise or slip of some sort, in addition to a corset and probably a corset cover (sort of like a camisol). The undergarments would have been made of lighterweight fabrics, such as muslin or lawn, but the outer garments were often made from twill, wool, silks, rayons, linens and fine cottons. All the layers would weigh at least 10 pounds. Skirts are pretty heavy if made from twill or wool. The corset was a necessary garment to carry the weight of the clothing!

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  7. I get a headache just thinking about carrying around that much on my head. wild.

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  8. It has indeed been a journey through the lifes and times of Nettie L Park's Council Bluffs, Iowa and its neighboring farms and town around the turn of the 1900s.

    I just feel frustrated at not being able to find a decendent of Nettie's even with knowing the names of her four sons and the married names of her four daughters. Left unexplained are a number of loose threads - such as this one - just who are these women? They can't be Nettie's four daughters, they weren't born yet in 1890. Perhaps they are "Aunt Fronia's" family?

    No matter what you decide to do - as far as the pictures "going home" - someone will not be "happy" - and yet, they all should be thrilled beyond words to just see their ancestors images posted here - let alone receive the originals... a lot of work went into finding possible offspring - and it was an offspring of Nettie's (or their caretakers) that made a horrible and tragic mistake of "dismantling" and then "discarding" this album. It truly belongs in a museum and viewable to the public with an interest in the times and places that it reveals in the remaining photos.

    What I hope is - that one of Nettie's many grandchildren (and even more numerous great-grandchildren) stumble across this website and this collection - and reclaim (even if only electronically) a significant portion of their "roots".

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Hi, Thanks for the comments, your input on these old photos is appreciated! I don't do awards, award me a comment! English only please! This is a word verification free blog. I can no longer accept anonymous comments.
Connie