Thursday, December 16, 2010

Photo Number 398

Well ..back to some of my old photos..this one is from an Antique Shop in Motley, Minnesota. 
Childs Studio CdV Motley AS
This is a CdV or a Cartes d’ visite, very close in size to our wallet photos..it is just a little larger.  I bought this one because of the ladies bustle…this photo was most likely taken sometime in 1881 to 1886.  Norkio is the expert in this time period..so we will see if she has a comment!   The gentleman is sporting quite a moustache! I wonder what the occasion was?
Childs  Studio CdV Michigan  Motley ASChilds Art Gallery was in business in Ishpeming, Michigan from 1870 to 1950.  This CdV does not have rounded corners.

Thanks for stopping by, do come again:) 

Update from Norkio! Thanks!! 
Wow! Great example of the Natural Form costume that was popular 1877-1882!!! In between the first and second bustle periods was the natural form, which eschewed the wire frame and pillow bustles. The straight skirt that hugged the legs was considered scandalous! Trims, ruffles, pleats, contrasting fabrics and more were all over skirts, while bodices were kept fairly simple. This bodice is probably a "cuirass" bodice (pronounced choir-as), which trended to extend below the hips by the end of the natural form period. I picture this dress in a combination of reds and browns, maybe with a rose ribbon in there. There may have been up to five different fabrics used; mostly wool, silk, taffeta, linen, and satin. Cotton was reserved for undergarments.

Let it be known that while the natural form costume occurred at around the same time as the rational dress reform movement, the natural form costume was definitely worn with a corset and all the standard undergarments! (Rational dress pushed for the abolition of the corset among other goals.)

Again, fabulous photo documenting the lovely natural form dress. This is one of my favorite fashion periods of the second half of the 19th century!!

10 comments:

  1. That's a great bustle and a great mustache!

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  2. So much better than a Facebook profile picture

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  3. Child's Art Gallery had quite a run - lasting 80 years! This photo went about 370 miles due west from the Gallery to Motley (there really is a place called Motley!) over the course of 126 or so years. This works out to 0.000335 miles per hour (or 1.77 feet per hour) which would pretty much be honest to gosh "snail mail"!

    :) No wonder the photos were so small. :)

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  4. Is that mustache lop sided or is that part of the background on the man's right side?

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  5. Maybelline, His mustache does not extend beyond his face. On his right side there is a smear or scenery or something:)

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  6. That dress is quite fascinating!

    http://ernzbug.blogspot.com/

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  7. Wow! Great example of the Natural Form costume that was popular 1877-1882!!! In between the first and second bustle periods was the natural form, which eschewed the wire frame and pillow bustles. The straight skirt that hugged the legs was considered scandalous! Trims, ruffles, pleats, contrasting fabrics and more were all over skirts, while bodices were kept fairly simple. This bodice is probably a "cuirass" bodice (pronounced choir-as), which trended to extend below the hips by the end of the natural form period. I picture this dress in a combination of reds and browns, maybe with a rose ribbon in there. There may have been up to five different fabrics used; mostly wool, silk, taffeta, linen, and satin. Cotton was reserved for undergarments.

    Let it be known that while the natural form costume occurred at around the same time as the rational dress reform movement, the natural form costume was definitely worn with a corset and all the standard undergarments! (Rational dress pushed for the abolition of the corset among other goals.)

    Again, fabulous photo documenting the lovely natural form dress. This is one of my favorite fashion periods of the second half of the 19th century!!

    Norkio

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  8. Great photo. I like the way she is looking off into the distance whereas he appears to be 'challenging' the camera. Fab!

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  9. Thanks to this blog, when scanning some family photos, yesterday, I either lightly wrote some info on the back, or included a little piece of paper behind it and the back of the frame. Maybe one day it will be helpful for someone. Fascinating and fun blog, thanks!

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  10. Way to go Star! Marking photos is a start! You can purchase a photo pencil that works great to mark photos on the back..I got mine from Creative Memories..I have many to mark too:)

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Hi, Thanks for the comments, your input on these old photos is appreciated! I don't do awards, award me a comment! English only please! This is a word verification free blog. I can no longer accept anonymous comments.
Connie