Saturday, December 4, 2010

Photo Number 389

Tintype Pam 2 inches by 3 1-4 inches
This is a tintype, it measures 2 inches by 3 1/4 inch. I will guess that this is from the early 1870’s.  The dresses have slightly dropped shoulders and have lots of trim in the form of bows and tassels or fringe.  Their hair styles are also less severe and their ears are showing.

I wonder..Mother and daughter or sisters?

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Update from Norkio: 
I agree that these are 1870s dresses. The early bustle period (1869-1876) featured softly bustled dresses created with flounces, padding and pillows, not the exaggerated and structured cage bustles of the later bustle period. I also agree that these are sisters and relatively young - maybe late teens. The girl on the right has her hair down which is definitely a hairstyle of youth and an advertisement to young men of her charms and beauty. The girl seated has a faux curl dangling on her shoulder. That would have been an "add on" made from natural hair, possibly her own, that she could clip into her hair. It was designed to convey a soft and gentle femininity, and was they height of fashion to have between one and three on one side of the head.

The dresses are luxurious with lots of trims. First, the seated girl has a simple and clean look but she is not lacking in trim. Her dress has some sort of apron that comes to midthigh or even midcalf. You can just see that it goes around to the back of her dress - there's a fold of fabric in the chair. I think the apron probably goes to her knees in front, is gathered up on the sides, then back down across her bottom in back. Very clean lines. The other girl has a very feminine and flounced dress. Her skirt in back may be bustled sort of like we bustle wedding dresses today - the skirts are folded up underneath themselves, not he best description - and that creates the poufs that were desirable. I can just see the edge of something from behind her, but I can't tell what it is, some part of her dress.

9 comments:

  1. The dresses are exquisite. They look like Mother and daughter to me.

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  2. In my opinion they look close in age. No farther than five years apart. Lovely dresses.

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  3. I think They look like sisters. They don't look very far apart in age.

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  4. Great blog.
    Greeting from old photos enthusiast from Norway.

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  5. Hair is interesting. It seems unusual to see naturally curly hair, which the girl on the right seems to have. Usually, when you see curls, they're made with an iron.

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  6. I think sisters, mostly because I don't know if I have ever seen a mother from that era wear her hair "down." They definitely share all the same features.

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  7. Each has offered an oblique angle...and then of course one didn't smile for the photographer in those days. Sisters, cousins, friends...traveling best clothes.
    How fun to see them...ladies in their day.

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  8. I had a whole long comment written out and it disappeared! Ugg I will try to recreate it.

    I agree that these are 1870s dresses. The early bustle period (1869-1876) featured softly bustled dresses created with flounces, padding and pillows, not the exaggerated and structured cage bustles of the later bustle period. I also agree that these are sisters and relatively young - maybe late teens. The girl on the right has her hair down which is definitely a hairstyle of youth and an advertisement to young men of her charms and beauty. The girl seated has a faux curl dangling on her shoulder. That would have been an "add on" made from natural hair, possibly her own, that she could clip into her hair. It was designed to convey a soft and gentle femininity, and was they height of fashion to have between one and three on one side of the head.

    The dresses are luxurious with lots of trims. First, the seated girl has a simple and clean look but she is not lacking in trim. Her dress has some sort of apron that comes to midthigh or even midcalf. You can just see that it goes around to the back of her dress - there's a fold of fabric in the chair. I think the apron probably goes to her knees in front, is gathered up on the sides, then back down across her bottom in back. Very clean lines. The other girl has a very feminine and flounced dress. Her skirt in back may be bustled sort of like we bustle wedding dresses today - the skirts are folded up underneath themselves, not he best description - and that creates the poufs that were desirable. I can just see the edge of something from behind her, but I can't tell what it is, some part of her dress.

    Beautiful image!

    Norkio

    ReplyDelete

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Connie